Homework – Jekyll and Hyde

Have your essays finished for Wednesday 9th October, please.

Also, your short stories should ALL be handed to me by then. Anyone who doesn’t submit this will be referred – it’s for your folio, so this is important.

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Jekyll and Hyde – Critical Essay

An example paragraph to assist with your own planning – do not use this in your essays; you should write in your own words.

Point (topic sentence): In our first meeting with Mr Hyde, Stevenson immediately explores the theme of addiction through his portrayal of Hyde’s desperate need for isolation.
Evidence (quotation): At Mr Utterson’s first encounter with Hyde, it is clear he is anxious to remain in solitude.
“Mr Hyde shrank back with a hissing intake of breath.”
Evaluation (analysis): Stevenson’s description of Hyde and how he “shrank back” suggests that Hyde fears discovery, through its connotations of secrecy and hiding. His use of onomatopoeia in “hissing” explores this further, inferring that he is hissing in pain – as though the thought of discovery is physically painful for him. It is apparent that Hyde does not want to be discovered, especially by Utterson. This first meeting with Hyde effectively emphasises the themes of secrecy and discovery that run throughout the novel, as well as heavily implies classic behaviours of addiction in Hyde’s need to remain hidden. The painful reaction he has to discovery highlights the mysterious nature of his character, and cleverly foreshadows the pain and destruction that this addiction will soon bring about.

Jekyll and Hyde – Critical Essay 1

Here’s the essay question, along with the critical essay structure. Have a look over this and try to think of how you will structure and plan your essay.

Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde is a novella mostly concerned with addiction. How is addiction explored in the text and to what extent do you agree with the previous statement?

PEE Essay Structure

In every paragraph, remember to PEE.

P is for Point: The Point is simply what each paragraph is about- you make a main point in every paragraph you write. This is usually the TOPIC SENTENCE you use.

E is for Evidence: The Evidence is the quotation or description of the scene, shot or technique you are using to back up your point.

E is also for Evaluation: This is the chance for you to explain how the quotation backs up the point you are making, i.e. the 3 steps of analysis. You then need to evaluate it – comment on how successful it is.

3 Steps for Analysing Quotations

1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and connotations of individual words, techniques and phrases, as well as the whole sentence.

2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests.

3. Comment on the context of the quotation.

EXAMPLE:

1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and connotations of individual words, techniques and phrases, as well as the whole sentence.
e.g. “…about three o’clock of a black winter morning…”

Stevenson’s use of pathetic fallacy in the word “black” not only has connotations of darkness and death, but infers that the morning itself is in a “black” mood, with a foul temper.

2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests

e.g. “…about three o’clock of a black winter morning…”

The quotation as a whole sets a sombre tone even at this early stage of the novel.

3. Comment on the context of the quotation

e.g. “…about three o’clock of a black winter morning…”

Through his use of pathetic fallacy, Stevenson effectively foreshadows the mystery and mood still to come. It also hints at the darker aspects of human nature that we are soon to encounter through the character of Hyde, and Enfield’s tale of his violent trampling of the little girl.

Putting it all together:

“…about three o’clock of a black winter morning…”
Stevenson’s use of pathetic fallacy in the word “black” not only has strong connotations of darkness and death, but infers that the morning itself is in a “black” mood, with a foul temper. The quotation as a whole successfully sets a sombre tone even at this early stage of the novel. Through his use of pathetic fallacy, Stevenson effectively foreshadows the mystery and mood still to come. It also hints at the darker aspects of human nature that we are soon to encounter through the character of Hyde, and Enfield’s tale of his violent trampling of the little girl.

Setting – Quotes you need to know

  • Symbolism of the door – page 8/18
  • The embattled city; London as an extended metaphor for the struggle within Jekyll – The Carew Murder Case page 27/52
  • Use of fog as a symbol for mystery and secrecy p27/52-53 – foreshadowing Utterson’s dilemma concerning the letter page 32/61.
  • Pathetic fallacy used, foreshadowing the increasing tension to come later in the novel – page 9/19
  • Jekyll’s laboratory – page 30/58
  • Contrast between Soho and more respectable parts of the city– p 15/29 and p27/53.

HOMEWORK, Due Friday 06/09/2013: Find and copy out each of the above quotes, leaving around half a page blank underneath. We will be analysing these tomorrow.

Jekyll and Hyde – Chapter 9, Dr Lanyon’s Narrative

So, after discovering Mr Hyde dead in Jekyll’s laboratory, wearing Jekyll’s clothes, Utterson finally reads Lanyon’s letter, detailing his discoveries regarding Jekyll’s mysterious behaviour, and the gruesome truth which shocked Lanyon literally to death.

In this chapter, Jekyll ensures that Lanyon actually bears witness to him transforming – an act so awful that Lanyon is utterly sickened by it. Was this done purely for ego – a kind of “look-how-smart-I-am” move – or is this Jekyll’s conscience trying to reach out to his old friend for help, finally realising that he has absolutely no control over this dark side of himself?

We at last also hear something from Jekyll himself, via a letter addressed to Lanyon. Why has Stevenson done this? Despite Jekyll being arguably the main character, we rarely have insight from his perspective – could this be to continue the mystery of the novel; uncovering the truth slowly, layer by layer, through third person narrative, such as Utterson, Enfield, the maid and Lanyon?

Jekyll and Hyde – Chapters 1 and 2, Analysing Quotations

Some good work today, guys, just make sure you remember the 3 steps of analysis:

1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and connotations of individual words, techniques and phrases, as well as the whole sentence.

e.g ”…the man trampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see.”

“calmly” suggests Hyde had no compulsions over harming the child, and contrast between this and and “screaming” emphasises how callous he was.

“Hellish” not only tells us how awful a sight it was, but links Hyde’s actions to something evil, or “damned”.

2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests.

e.g. ”…the man trampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see.”

The sentence shows that there is no mercy in Hyde’s actions, as well as highlighting the brutality of what Lanyon has witnessed.

3. Comment on the context of the quotation.

e.g. ”…the man trampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see.”

Already we become aware of Hyde’s cruelty and vicious nature, even in harming an innocent child. This brutal incident foreshadows the violence and evil that Hyde continues to wreak throughout the novel.

HOMEWORK, DUE Wednesday 28/08/2013 – Read to the end of Chapter 5 ‘The Incident of the Letter’, and complete your analysis of your five quotes.